Tag Archives: photography

Darkroom – The obsessions of Bob Carlos Clarke

15 Sep

In honour of the late erotic photographer Bob Carlos Clarke, The Bob Carlos Clarke Foundation and The Little Black Gallery are seeking donations to make a film based on his life and work.

They’re looking to make a minimum of £75,000. Anyone who donates £100 or more will get their name listed in the credits, and anyone who donates £5000 or more will be listed  in the credits as a Executive Producer.

Details on how to donate can be found on the following link:
http://www.bobcarlosclarke.co.uk/darkroom-the-obsessions-of-bob-carlos-clarke/

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Photography – Tom Bianchi

4 Aug

Tom Bianchi is a prolific American writer and photographer who specialises in male nude photography, and has had several books, poems and essays published over his career.

Being a gay man gives Tom a keen eye on what makes a good male nude photo, with his work consisting of well built hunky men having fun with each other in front of the camera!

If that sounds like your kind of thing, you can get a copy of “On The Couch: Volume Two”, one of Tom’s best photography books from our webshop: http://coffeecakeandkink.com/productdetails.aspx?cp=401&item=Tom+Bianchi%3a+On+the+Couch+2&sid=1041

Photography – New Club Kids

28 Jul

New Club Kids is a window into a unique clubbing subculture that does away with conforming to a set style of fashion, choosing to roll the dice and dress up in all manner that thinks “outside the box”.

This book showcases the gamut of crazy freeform fashion that these fringe clubbers choose to wear to the parties, the motto being “Dress like your life depends on it, or don’t bother”.

The author, Oggy Yordanov has lived in London’s Soho district since 2001, and has immersed himself within the London club scene. He was also a fan and admirer of CCK.

Here’s an extract of an interview with him from the book:

While selecting the photographs for this book, I reviewed thousands of images shot over the past decade. The incredible memories flooded back, all those amazing parties and amazing people that made my years in the great city of London so phenomenal. I want you to share these memories.

At the time I moved to London, in early 2001, the party scene was still dominated by the super-clubs – places like Fabric, Ministry of Sound, Fridge, Heaven and Turnmills – providing a vibrant playground for the young clubber.

There were huge capacity venues with great DJ line-ups that pulled in massive crowds of enegetic party-goers, but one breed of party animal was missing – the club kid.

It was the time of “less is more” and dressing down was the ongoing trend. For a while I believed that the avant garde fashion of the real underground London had disappeared, somehow vanished with the modern transformation of clubland. Thankfully, things were starting to change.

Fashion has always walked hand in hand with music and London has a rich history of dressing-up. Club Kids or dressers, as some would prefer encapsulate the creative London as I know it. Fabul0us, yet trashy beautiful and scary, glamorous or freaky–meet the New Lond0n Club Kids.

New Club Kids can be bought from the following links:
Amazon UK: http://amzn.to/aR4x6N
Waterstones UK: http://bit.ly/hx4Gll

Related links:
http://www.londonclubkids.com/
http://oyordanov.blogspot.com/

Artist Spotlight – Barry Gollop

19 Jul

Photographing the real gay bear in its natural environment, Barry “The Bear” Gollop is a man who knows his subject! New York born, Barry traveled across Europe and gained a love of photography, which he has turned to his advantage in putting a spotlight on the big and burly gay men known as “The Bear”.

Filled to the brim with hairy well built and hunky men in exotic locations, Barry brings a gritty and striking feel to his work that gives a flavour of what makes Bears so appealing!

Check out his work in “The Bear: Essentials”, available to buy from our webshop. Take a walk on the wild side!

Fishers of Men

25 Mar

Having delighted many a fan of muscular men with previous photoshoots for their clothing ranges, Dolce and Gabbana have not disappointed said fans again. Steven Klein’s photoshoot for Dolce and Gabbana’s spring/summer collection has a Spartacus-come-Sicilian fishermen theme. Grappling with ropes, netting and chains, as well as each other, (which I am sure we are all quite familiar with, in one form or another!) the mixture of smooth, pretty boys and hairy, rugged-type models get all sweaty in their range of warm weather wear.

Fashion photography is reknowned for using kinky, erotica-themed ideas. In this particular shoot the muscular homoeroticism fair ripples off the page! If you are a connosseur of such imagery, you should check out Coffee, Cake and Kink’s selection of Ulli Richter’s photography, which gives a few, hard lessons to any imitators. (Especially my personal fave ‘Hard Labour’. There’s no messing with these men!).

Hard Labour

Hard Labour

Exhibition – Keith Pattison: No Redemption

19 Feb

With a collection of photographs taken during the miners’ strike of 1984-5 around the Easington Colliery area in Durham, this exhibition is an insightful reflection of a working class community and its struggles in the era of Thatcherite cuts. The 55 photographs by Keith Pattison, showing at King’s Place Gallery until 4th March, evocatively captures a piece of recent history, with stunning representations of place, people and conflict.

Throughout the collection there is an impressive use of subject, light and framing. These beautiful black and white images have a wonderfully textural look, whilst capturing what are often quite bleak and hard-hitting subject matters. In terms of reportage, the photographs give a sense of what it must have been like to live in these communities, with depictions of the day-today lives of those who lived through it.

The struggles of the miners and their families, whether it was the battles with police and scabs, the constant pressure of having their town overtaken by outside forces, the need to provide some feeling of escapism and joy for the children or the hardship of getting enough money and food to survive are  shown graphically throughout. The faces captured in the photographs, from both sides of the divide, show the range of emotions felt. From the defiance, hardship, yet sense of unity and pride of the miners and their families, to the determined, hardened looks of the police, these are wonderful studies of portraiture.

The depiction of the Easington area itself, with its rows of terraced houses, scrubby grass verges and stunningly dramatic coastline all dominated by the colliery and its industrial architecture, is made all the more poignant yet relevant to viewers today. These images may only have been taken 25 years ago, yet, with the loss of the mining industry in the area, they allow us to see what is now a lost landscape.

While those of us who remember the miners strike, and the images from the media at the time, might feel a sense of familiarity with the photographs of the conflict between strikers and police, what makes this exhibition even more worthwhile are the shots of the miners and their families at home, at play, at meetings, in the canteens and welfare halls or in the streets. This exhibition takes the audience on a journey from the hope and determination of the earlier days of the strike, to the division, despair and bitter acceptance at the end of the action.

As a collection, Keith Pattison has brought together some stunning, powerful imagery. There are particular photographs I loved. One with a miner collecting sea coal at the beach, with a smile of conspiratorial cheekiness; a miner and his family at home watching Arthur Scargill on TV in a room of typical early 80s decor, a Turner reproduction and a poster of Karl Marx on the wall; riot police lined up outside a house as a mother holds her baby and looks out from an upstairs window. There are more, but it is the collection as a whole that makes you feel moved, informed and heartened. In these times of recession and cuts, this exhibition of Britain’s recent history is both relevant and palpable. I highly recommend it to everyone.

 

Cover of "No Redemption" - published by Flambard Press

 

 

Pattison’s photographs have been published in the book accompanying the exhibition; his images are introduced by writer David Peace, who interview three of the people caught up in the strikes. There isn’t really a better way to explain the effect of these interviews than the words of the publisher – “their memories, still freshly felt, make explicit the anger, pain, resilience and warmth captured in the photographs.

Keith Pattison’s images have also been used by Sunderland band Frankie and the Heartstrings on two of their vinyl releases; they played at the book launch.

 

7" single "Ungrateful" features the work of Keith Patterson

 

 

Corset and Diamonds – we went, we saw, we had a very good time!

31 Jan

Last weekend, CCK’s own photographer Kiera went down to Corsets and Diamonds; here are her thoughts on the fun she had. Kiera will be out and about at lots of events over the coming months, sometimes with one of our writers, sometimes on her own. If you see her, say hello! And if you have an event you’d like us to cover, let us know. Here’s Kiera though.


I went down to Corsets and Diamonds’ event ‘Pearl Harbour’ on Saturday at Clerkenwell House, and had a lovely time soaking up the friendly company and 1940s costumes and music. It was a mixed crowd of queers and straights with a focus on creating a women-friendly space – men are welcome if they are accompanying a woman. The rule of ‘Respect,  Glamour  and Dignity‘ was present throughout the evening, from the inclusiveness of the event, to the vintage costumes and decor.

A man and a woman pose for the camera - she is wearing a fitted red dress, glasses, and is drinking from a glass of wine, one hand on her hip. He is wearing a naval officer's uniform and tipping his hat to the camera

photo by K. James

Two women. One is wearing a naval officer's jacket and hat, and is smiling at the camera. The other is wearing a military jacket and is holding a glass of wine

photo by K. James

Corsets and Diamonds have been organising themed burlesque evenings every two months for the last couple of years. What sets them apart from the many other burlesque evenings out there is how genuine and unpretentious they are – as the website states, the parties are for “Beautiful people inside and out” and it is rare to find an event that actually pulls that off!

Here are some more photos of the night – click on them to see a bigger image.

Picture Perfect

22 Jan

There is currently a Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition taking place at Alison Jacques Gallery in London, running until 19th March. With his photographs, polaroids and sculptures chosen by the band Scissor Sisters, as well as works by other artists who have been influenced by Mapplethorpe, this is a rare opportunity to see these works together.

The photos chosen by the band, who have used Mapplethorpe’s imagery on their record covers in the past, cover his flower photography as well as his wonderful nudes, still-lifes and shots of leathermen and bondage. Mapplethorpe was a genius at capturing the human form, and his still-lifes and flower portraits are shot and lit with the same aesthetic appeal. If you are already a Mapplethorpe fan you will enjoy this exhibition immensely, and the works by other artists such as Matthew Barney and Scott Treleaven show how his work continues to inspire. If you are new to Mapplethorpe’s work (why has it taken you so long?), you can revel in its beauty, sensuality and kinkiness.

Though a relatively small exhibition, it is a fantastic reminder of a great artist. The works by the artists influenced by him have been cleverly chosen, keeping a sense of continuity running throughout the show. So, for lovers of great photography, (homo)erotica, stunning imagery and general kinkiness, get yourself to the exhibition and treat yourself to the great man’s work.

Black and white photograph. A human skull sits on top of crossed bones, placed on the top of a weathered column.

Robert Mapplethorpe, 'Skull and Crossbones' 1983



Robert Mapplethorpe, ‘Skull and Crossbones’ 1983

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